Online justice: why courts should explore emerging digital possibilities

People in all societies have disputes. In advanced legal systems the dominant approach to resolving them has been to instruct lawyers and appear before courts. But with the internet, advanced hardware and cutting-edge software coming on-stream, the days of fetching up in front of a judge with bulging case-files are beginning to change – though rather faster in some parts of the world than others. Continue reading Online justice: why courts should explore emerging digital possibilities

72 Young Lawyers to compete for Justice Ayo Philips Prize-See list

Registration for the 2018 Justice Ayo Philips Courtroom Mail Prize for Young Lawyers ended on Sunday 18th of February .72 Young lawyers have indicated interest to compete for the Prize after answering the registration question  below with C as the answer

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Baltimore County jury awards $37M to family of police shooting victim

The family of a Maryland woman who was fatally shot by police in 2016 after a six-hour standoff in her apartment was awarded more than $37 million Friday.

The jury took several hours to reach its decision in the case of Korryn Gaines, 23, who was shot by police Cpl. Royce Ruby, the Baltimore Sun reported. Continue reading Baltimore County jury awards $37M to family of police shooting victim

History: Courtroom Mail remembers the Green River serial killer who got 49 life sentences.

On this day in 2011, in a Kent, Washington, courtroom, Gary Leon Ridgway pleads guilty to the 1982 aggravated, first-degree murder of his 49th victim, 20-year-old Rebecca Marrero.  Marrero’s remains were found in December 2010, decades after her murder, in a ravine near Auburn, Washington. After entering his guilty plea, the 62-year-old Ridgway received his 49th life sentence without the possibility of parole and returned to the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla, where he was already serving 48 consecutive life sentences, one for each of the other women he killed. Continue reading History: Courtroom Mail remembers the Green River serial killer who got 49 life sentences.

Lawyers in Nairobi protest against disregard of Court orders with Yellow Ribbons

In light of recent incidents of disregard for court orders and constitutional provisions by State Officers, Law Society Kenya, Nairobi Branch participated in the #YellowRibbonCampaign organised by the Society allover the country. The Campaign is meant to highlight the significance of rule of law to justice. Respect for and obedience of court orders is paramount to the Rule of Law. Yellow ribbons were distributed at Milimani Law Courts.

Continue reading Lawyers in Nairobi protest against disregard of Court orders with Yellow Ribbons

Paul Usoro SAN receives a grand welcome in Calabar as C/Rivers lawyers hold a strategic meeting

A strategy meeting of Cross River State Nigerian Bar Association(NBA )elders and representatives of FIDA,Young Lawyers forum,Law officers was held today at the GOMAYS Galaxy Hall Calabar. Paul Usoro SAN was present and was given a resounding welcome. Continue reading Paul Usoro SAN receives a grand welcome in Calabar as C/Rivers lawyers hold a strategic meeting

‘My printer broke’: Barrister escapes suspension after PC blunder

A barrister who appeared for a client in court despite not holding a practising certificate has avoided suspension after a disciplinary tribunal accepted her arguments that IT troubles prevented her from applying to renew it on time.

Philippa Page was fined £1,000 after admitting to two charges of professional misconduct for exercising rights of audience at Wood Green and Woolwich Crown Court when not entitled to do so. The offences took place over 2 and 3 May last year.

Page said she had attempted to fill out the relevant form and pay the renewal fee over the May Bank Holiday weekend but ‘found this impossible.’

She then telephoned the Bar Standards Board (BSB), which advised her to download a form, fill it out and return it. However, referring to an email she had sent the BSB during the course of the investigation, she told a disciplinary tribunal: ‘I was unable to fill it out electronically on my iPad, undoubtedly due to my own incompetence and, as my printer had broken down, I could not print the form out at home.’

Page said that, as she had already accepted work for 2 May, she did not feel she could return it with such little notice. She eventually completed the form on 4 May.

Her email added: ‘I cannot explain why I subsequently failed to deal with my practising certificate on 3 May, I have no recollection of what happened on that day’. She admitted a ’tendency to let less important matters slip’.

The Bar Tribunals and Adjudication Service heard that Page had previously admitted practising without a valid practising certificate, between 1 and 8 May 2015.

Despite the tribunal noting that a suspension is the normal starting penalty for ‘repeated failures to meet practising requirements’, it said there were mitigating factors and Page had shown genuine remorse.